Lưu trữ theo thẻ: Thông Tin

Sáu năm hoạt động của tuyến BRT Hà Nội


Thứ tư, 29/6/2022, 10:37 (GMT+7) vnexpress

Được đầu tư vốn lớn cùng làn đường riêng, tuyến BRT đầu tiên của Hà Nội chưa thu hút được người dân, không giảm ùn tắc và thúc đẩy giao thông công cộng.

Tuyến BRT Kim Mã – Yên Nghĩa được phê duyệt từ năm 2007 với tổng vốn đầu tư khoảng 55 triệu USD, tương đương 1.100 tỷ đồng. Ngày 1/1/2017, tuyến bắt đầu hoạt động theo lộ trình Yên Nghĩa – Ba La – Lê Trọng Tấn – Tố Hữu – Lê Văn Lương – Láng Hạ – Giảng Võ – bến xe Kim Mã. Người dân di chuyển toàn tuyến dài 14,77 km sẽ mất khoảng 45 phút.

Dự án được thực hiện bằng vốn vay của Ngân hàng Thế giới (WB). Đây là hợp phần trong lộ trình dài hơi phát triển giao thông công cộng Hà Nội mà WB tham gia. Cơ quan này đưa ra nhiều mục tiêu khi xây dựng tuyến buýt nhanh, như cải thiện tình trạng ùn tắc, ô nhiễm; làm nền tảng phát triển hạ tầng giao thông công cộng; thúc đẩy người dân chuyển từ xe cá nhân sang phương tiện công cộng.

Đọc tiếp Sáu năm hoạt động của tuyến BRT Hà Nội

How the Sri Lankan economy run out of money to pay for food and fuel

Posted Fri 24 Jun 2022 at 9:06amFriday 24 Jun 2022 at 9:06am

abc.net.au

A woman cooks using a firewood hearth outside her house to the right of a small alleyway of houses.
Sri Lankan residents are using firewood to cook as fuel supplies become scarce during an economic crisis.(AP: Eranga Jayawardena)

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Sri Lanka’s Prime Minister says the island nation’s debt-laden economy has “collapsed” as it runs out of money to pay for food and fuel.

Short of cash to pay for imports of such necessities and already defaulting on its debt, the country is seeking help from neighbouring India and China and from the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe, who took office in May, has emphasised the monumental task he faces in turning around an economy he said was headed for “rock bottom”. Đọc tiếp How the Sri Lankan economy run out of money to pay for food and fuel

China jettisons underdog tag to become space force

SCMP

 Andrew MullenDeputy Editor, Political Economy 25 June 2022

Dear Global Impact Readers, 

Space, they say, is the final frontier. But how far does that frontier go and what’s out there? 

China, has in recent years, accelerated all things space as part of its busy science programme we recapped a few weeks ago, from landing a rover on Mars to nearing completion of its Tiangong space station.

In this issue, the SCMP’Stephen Chen, the news editor for science with our China desk, is back to look at China’s exploits and gaze into what the future holds for its ambitious space programme.  Đọc tiếp China jettisons underdog tag to become space force

The Future of the Quad and the Emerging Architecture in the Indo-Pacific

Photo credit: YashSD / Shutterstock.com

JUNE 21, 2022 gmfus.org

Garima
Kristi Govella

by Garima Mohan, Kristi Govella

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Summary

The Quadrilateral grouping of Australia, India, Japan, and the United States (the Quad) has come a long way from its origins, establishing itself as a crucial pillar of the Indo-Pacific regional architecture and significantly shifting in tone and focus from its early iterations. Since its revival in 2017, the Quad has been elevated to a leader-level dialogue, it has begun issuing joint statements, and it has developed a new working-group structure to facilitate cooperation. It has also significantly broadened and deepened its agenda to include vaccines, climate change, critical and emerging technologies, infrastructure, cyber, and space.

These recent changes to the Quad raise several questions about its future trajectory. What are the drivers of engagement, the domestic support, and the bureaucratic capacity in the four countries to continue investing in the Quad?  How well does the Quad’s new working-group structure function, and will the working groups be able to deliver tangible results? How has the Quad’s agenda evolved, and will it return to its initial focus on security challenges? Are the Quad countries open to cooperation with additional countries and, if so, what form will this take?

This paper analyzes these questions drawing on recent publications, official statements, and interviews with key experts and policymakers in the four countries. In doing so, it offers five key takeaways into the Quad as an evolving part of the Indo-Pacific architecture, as well as a vehicle for achieving the goals of its four member countries.

Since its revival in 2017, the Quad has been elevated to a leader-level dialogue, it has begun issuing joint statements, and it has developed a new working-group structure to facilitate cooperation

First, in terms of institutionalization and internal goals, there is little interest among the member countries in further institutionalizing the Quad by establishing a secretariat or adopting a charter. All four consider the flexible nature of the grouping to be an asset. At the same time, the Quad partners have increased their alignment on strategic issues and aim to continue doing so in the near future by solidifying ties within the grouping.

Đọc tiếp The Future of the Quad and the Emerging Architecture in the Indo-Pacific

As one political generation fades, who will take their place?

foreignpolicy.com – JUNE 16, 2022, 5:00 PM

Demonstrators carry pictures of former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, during a protest in Karachi on Dec. 24, 2019. RIZWAN TABASSUM/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES

This week brought news that the health of two former South Asian leaders has taken a turn for the worse. Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, who ruled the country as a military dictator for nearly a decade in the 2000s, is hospitalized with a rare and incurable disease that causes organ damage. In Bangladesh, former Prime Minister Khaleda Zia, who served two separate terms, had a heart attack.

That many South Asian leaders have reached old age speaks to the relative improvement in the region’s political stability, after decades when executions by coup or assassinations were not uncommon in some countries. Former Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and former Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif have each recently experienced health issues. India lost one former prime minister in 2018, and Pakistan has lost two former leaders since 2020.

Đọc tiếp As one political generation fades, who will take their place?

Security and Economic Challenges for Taiwan in Cross-Strait Relations

Home » Security and Economic Challenges for Taiwan in Cross-Strait Relations

Taiwan

Security and Economic Challenges for Taiwan in Cross-Strait Relations

Chien-pin Li is Professor of Political Science and Dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Sam Houston State University. Before his current position, he taught at Kennesaw State University for 26 years, and was a founding member of the China Research Center. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Iowa and was an Associate Research Fellow at Academia Sinica (Taipei, Taiwan), a Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council of the United States (Washington, D.C.) and a Research Fellow at the Pacific Cultural Foundation (Taipei, Taiwan). His teaching and research interests focus on East Asian political economy, including trade disputes, trade negotiations, and regional integration. He is the author of Rising East Asia: The Quest for Governance, Prosperity, and Security (2020) and has published articles in Asian Survey, Pacific Review, Issues & Studies, International Studies Quarterly, and other journals. 

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The security and economic landscape in the Indo-Pacific is increasingly difficult to navigate. While trade agreements such as the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, the successor to the Trans-Pacific Partnership or TPP, and the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership signal an interest to cooperate in a region full of economic vibrancy, competition and rivalry between great powers cast significant uncertainty over the peace and stability in the region. The paradoxical trends in economic and security affairs are particularly evident in cross-Strait relations between Taiwan and China.

Đọc tiếp Security and Economic Challenges for Taiwan in Cross-Strait Relations

China’s Threat of Force in the Taiwan Strait

By Raul “Pete” PedrozoTuesday, September 29, 2020, 9:16 AM lawfareblog

A view of Taiwan’s Kaohsiung Harbor, which faces the Taiwan Strait. (Flick/Formosa Wandering, https://flic.kr/p/9aCnHR; CC BY-NC 2.0, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/)

Raul "Pete" Pedrozo

Captain Raul (Pete) Pedrozo, U.S. Navy (Ret.), is the Howard S. Levie Chair on the Law of Armed Conflict and Professor of International Law in the Stockton Center for International Law at the U.S. Naval War College. He was a Peer Reviewer for the International Committee of the Red Cross Commentary of 2017 on the Convention (II) for the Amelioration of the Condition of Wounded, Sick and Shipwrecked Members Of the Armed Forces at Sea (1949) and is currently one of two U.S. representative to the International Group of Experts for the San Remo Manual on the Law Applicable to Armed Conflicts at Sea, produced by the International Institute of Humanitarian Law. Prior to his retirement from the Navy he served as the senior legal advisor to Commander, U.S. Pacific Command and was a Special Assistant to the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, Office of the Secretary of Defense. Pedrozo is co-author of the forthcoming, “Emerging Technology and the Law of the Sea” (Oxford University Press).

________

On Sept. 18 and 19, People’s Liberation Army combat aircraft on 40 occasions intentionally crossed the median line in the Taiwan Strait that separates mainland China from the island of Taiwan. Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen immediately condemned the provocation as a “threat of force.”

The center line in the Taiwan Strait (also known as the median line, middle line or Davis Line, named after Brig. Gen. Benjamin Davis, commander of Task Force 13 in Taipei and famed commander of the World War II Tuskegee Airmen) has its origins in the 1954 U.S.-Taiwan Mutual Defense Treaty. The treaty was one link in the chain of U.S. collective defense arrangements in the Western Pacific—which included agreements with the Republic of the Philippines, Australia, New Zealand, Japan and the Republic of Korea—designed to resist further communist subversive activities directed against their territorial integrity and political stability. Pursuant to Article V of the Mutual Defense Treaty, an armed attack in the treaty area, which included Taiwan and the Pescadores (or Penghu) Islands, directed against the territory of either party would be considered a danger “to its own peace and safety” and each party “would act to meet the common danger in accordance with its constitutional processes.” An addendum to the treaty established a buffer zone into which U.S. aircraft were not allowed to enter.

Đọc tiếp China’s Threat of Force in the Taiwan Strait

A Transactional Mindset Won’t Win in the Indo-Pacific

 

June 10, 2022 Matthew P. Goodman, Senior Vice President for Economics, CSIS

 

Responding to widespread criticism of the Biden administration’s paltry offer of funding for Southeast Asian partners at a recent summit, a wise friend offered a colorful metaphor: “If we’re dating and I sense that you’re being transactional, then I want you to take me to the best restaurant in town and get the priciest bottle of wine. If you want a long-term relationship, buy me a cheap bottle of Chianti and we can sit on the roof and watch the sunset.”

My friend is right: no amount of money will win hearts and minds in the vital Indo-Pacific region unless it comes with a credible demonstration of long-term commitment to the region.

Đọc tiếp A Transactional Mindset Won’t Win in the Indo-Pacific

Unpacking the IPEF: Biden’s First Big Trade Play

The Joe Biden administration has unveiled its Indo-Pacific Economic Framework, but it doesn’t look like a traditional trade deal and could end up falling short of its ambitions.  

Article by Inu Manak, Council on Foreign Relations

Last updated June 8, 2022 3:39 pm (EST)

From left to right, Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, U.S. President Joe Biden, and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi attend the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework (IPEF) launch event in Tokyo in May 2022.
From left to right, Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, U.S. President Joe Biden, and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi attend the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework (IPEF) launch event in Tokyo in May 2022. Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

In late May, the Joe Biden administration launched its first major trade initiative: the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework (IPEF). The IPEF is billed as an effort to expand U.S. economic leadership in the Indo-Pacific region. This was also the objective of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a trade deal that was negotiated during the Barack Obama administration. But President Donald Trump withdrew from the TPP in 2017, and the Biden administration has made clear that it does not intend to reenter that trade pact, which is now renamed the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, or CPTPP.

Đọc tiếp Unpacking the IPEF: Biden’s First Big Trade Play

Censors silence popular influencer around Tiananmen Square Massacre anniversary

foreignpolicy

June 4, the anniversary of the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre—in which People’s Liberation Army (PLA) forces killed hundreds and perhaps thousands of protesters as well as crushing demonstrations across the country—is a fraught moment in China. In Hong Kong, the public once freely memorialized the massacre. This year, authorities again used the national security law passed in 2020 to block gatherings; six people were arrested.

In mainland China, the anniversary claimed an unexpected victim: e-commerce influencer Li Jiaqi, widely known as the “Lipstick Brother” or “Lipstick King.” During a livestream on June 3, Li was presented with a cake that resembled a tank. Censors promptly pulled the show offline, and it hasn’t returned, with Li’s team citing “technical difficulties.” Early June is a prime time for online shopping ahead of June 18, China’s second-biggest day for online sales. But Li’s name now returns blank results on search platforms, even on e-commerce sites.

Đọc tiếp Censors silence popular influencer around Tiananmen Square Massacre anniversary

Asia Pacific: How leaders are big on talk but little on action

Transparency Int’l – 01 April 2016

If there was one common challenge to unite the Asia Pacific region, it would be corruption. From campaign pledges to media coverage to civil society forums, corruption dominates discussion. Yet despite all this talk, there’s little sign of action. Between Australia’s slipping scores and North Korea’s predictably disastrous performance, the 2015 index shows no significant improvement. Has Asia Pacific stalled in its efforts to fight corruption?

This year’s poor results demand that leaders revisit the genuineness of their efforts and propel the region beyond stagnation.

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The good

The public desire for change is huge. In India, Sri Lanka and elsewhere, we’ve seen a host of governments coming to power on anti-corruption platforms. As corruption continues to dominate media coverage across and beyond the region, increasing interest in the issue has sparked a raft of new research into both public and private sector corruption.

The bad

So why this picture of zero progress? Despite boastful efforts on petty corruption, Malaysia’s 1MBD scandal brought the crux of the challenge into sharp focus: is political leadership genuinely committed to fighting corruption throughout society? The Malaysian prime minister’s inability to answer questions on the US$700 million that made its way into his personal bank account is only the tip of the iceberg.

In India and Sri Lanka leaders are falling short of their bold promises, while governments in Bangladesh and Cambodia are exacerbating corruption by clamping down on civil society. In Afghanistan and Pakistan a failure to tackle corruption is feeding ongoing vicious conflicts, while China’s prosecutorial approach isn’t bringing sustainable remedy to the menace. This inability to tackle root causes holds true across the region – witness, for example, Australia’s dwindling score in recent years.

Malaysia’s 1MBD scandal brought the challenge into sharp focus: is political leadership genuinely committed to fighting corruption throughout society?

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What needs to happen

Reversing corruption is clearly not solely down to governments, but they’re the ones with the largest role and the power to create enabling environments for others. This year’s poor results demand that leaders revisit the genuineness of their efforts and propel the region beyond stagnation. They must fulfil promises, and ensure efforts aren’t undermined in practice. Anti-corruption commissions are a prime example here: while their creation across the region is commendable, ongoing political interference and inadequate resources has meant many are unable to fulfil their mandate. This has to be addressed.

Bribery or personal connections?

When and why people pay bribes or use personal connections

Illustration by Meel Tamphanon

transparency – 24 November 2020

Across Asia, the use of personal connections to get ahead is a common practice.

In addition to paying bribes for the services they need, people use their family or social contacts to skip the line or gain quicker and better access to schools and hospitals, and “speed up” government paperwork such as driver’s licenses or birth certificates..

How much you can increase the speed and quality of your service often depends on how much you can pay or who you know.

In the Global Corruption Barometer — Asia, we asked people about how and why they paid bribes or used personal connections when accessing public services across Asia.

Đọc tiếp Bribery or personal connections?

The Fourth Industrial Revolution: a seductive idea requiring critical engagement

Published: June 8, 2022 2.58pm BST The Conversation

Authors

  1. Ruth Castel-Branco, Research Manager, University of the Witwatersrand
  2. Hannah J. Dawson, Senior Researcher, Southern Centre for Inequality Studies, University of the Witwatersrand

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The authors do not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and have disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

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Technological innovation can indeed be beneficial for the working class. Photo by JNS/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Narrative frames are fundamental to unifying ideologies. They frame what is possible and impossible, which ideas can be accepted and which must be rejected. In her book, Digital Democracy, Analogue Politics, storyteller and political analyst Nanjala Nyabola examines the framing of the Fourth Industrial Revolution narrative in this light.

Đọc tiếp The Fourth Industrial Revolution: a seductive idea requiring critical engagement

PODCAST – Asia Stream: Asia’s Inflation Dilemma

Rising prices are hurting wallets across the world. The crisis is particularly bad in Sri Lanka and Turkey, and in Japan, people are facing inflation for the first time in decades.

Nikkei staff writersMay 20, 2022 07:38 JST

NEW YORK — Welcome to Nikkei Asia’s podcast: Asia Stream.

Every episode, Asia Stream tracks and analyzes the Indo-Pacific with a mix of expert interviews and original reporting by our correspondents from across the globe.

New episodes are recorded biweekly and are available on Apple PodcastsSpotify and all other major platforms, and on our YouTube channel.

Đọc tiếp PODCAST – Asia Stream: Asia’s Inflation Dilemma

Cảnh báo vỡ nợ chéo từ “quả bom” trái phiếu (5 kỳ)

Cảnh báo vỡ nợ chéo từ “quả bom” trái phiếu – Kỳ 1: Bom nợ âm ỉ từ những hợp đồng ma quái

Hà Tâm – 20/05/2022 09:35 nhadautu

Ngây ngất trong men say của trái phiếu doanh nghiệp (TPDN), nhà đầu tư, doanh nghiệp phát hành, doanh nghiệp phân phối lẫn đơn vị tư vấn đều thực hiện những cú bắt tay dưới gầm bàn.

TIN LIÊN QUAN

Bom nợ từ đó âm ỉ hình thành và bắt đầu phát nổ.

Tàn dư của cú sốc trái phiếu doanh nghiệp Tân Hoàng Minh thật nặng nề. Thị trường trái phiếu khựng lại. Thị trường chứng khoán đỏ lửa. Doanh nghiệp hoang mang. Nhà đầu tư tháo chạy. Chính phủ quan tâm, lo lắng. Quốc hội đặt nhiều câu hỏi chất vấn. Trước sức ép từ nhiều phía, Bộ Tài chính đang tìm cách siết chặt thị trường này, cả cung lẫn cầu. Từ đây, một quả bom khác lớn hơn đang dần được kích hoạt: hiểm họa vỡ nợ chéo. Làm thế nào để kiểm soát rủi ro trái phiếu doanh nghiệp mà vẫn khuyến khích thị trường nợ phát triển đòi hỏi một cuộc cách mạng về cơ chế cho thị trường vốn. 

Đọc tiếp Cảnh báo vỡ nợ chéo từ “quả bom” trái phiếu (5 kỳ)