Lưu trữ theo thẻ: Thế giới

Putin and Xi are as close as ever, and that’s a problem for the US 

CNN Simone McCarthy, CNN ----------
When Antony Blinken makes an expected trip to Beijing in the coming days for what would be the first visit to China by a US secretary of state since 2018, he will be cutting a stark contrast to the scene in the Chinese capital one year earlier.  Then, Chinese leader Xi Jinping welcomed Russian President Vladimir Putin for the opening of the Beijing Olympics – meeting for talks and dinner in Putin’s honor, and declaring a “no limits” partnership between the two neighbors. Weeks later, as Russian tanks rolled across the border into Ukraine starting an invasion that would devastate the country and cause a humanitarian crisis, Chinese leaders did not shrink from that declaration.  Though Beijing claimed impartiality in the conflict and no advance knowledge of Russia’s intent, it also refused to condemn Moscow. Instead, it parroted Kremlin lines blaming NATO for provoking the conflict – further fracturing relationships with both Europe and the US.  Đọc tiếp Putin and Xi are as close as ever, and that’s a problem for the US 

Europe’s New Moral Crusade: A campaign against progressive values

Al Jazeera English – 24-12-2022

Encouraged by the reversal of pro-abortion rights in the United States, a loose coalition of evangelical Christians, far-right politicians and Russian oligarchs are now engaged in a fierce campaign against progressive, liberal values in Europe.

But what is driving this so-called moral crusade? And who is funding it?

For People & Power, filmmakers Sarah Spiller, Mark Williams and Callum Macrae went in search of answers.

Europe’s New Moral Crusade: A campaign against progressive values | People and Power

The World’s Stake in American Democracy

America’s democratic difficulties will have major implications for the world.

Article by Richard Haass, PF

Originally published at Project Syndicate

January 24, 2023 12:28 pm (EST)

A voter arrives at a polling place on March 3, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
A voter arrives at a polling place on March 3, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

For more than three-quarters of a century, the United States has played an outsized, constructive role in the world. To be sure, there have been major errors, including the Vietnam War and the 2003 Iraq War, but the US got it right far more often than not.

Đọc tiếp The World’s Stake in American Democracy

11 crises to watch in 2023

UNOCHA

As the war in Ukraine dominates the international headlines, dozens of other humanitarian crises need our urgent attention. Most of them are driven by conflict and climate shocks, compounded by pre-existing vulnerability and inadequate access to services. This year sets a new record, with UN agencies and humanitarian partners requiring US$51.5 billion to help 230 million people who need emergency assistance in 68 countries.

In addition to Ukraine, here are 11 crises on our radar.

Esha Mohammed, a herder and mother in Eli Dar, in Ethiopia's Afar Region, July 2022. Credit: UNOCHA/Liz Loh-Taylor

Esha Mohammed, a herder and mother in Eli Dar, in Ethiopia’s Afar Region, July 2022. Credit: UNOCHA/Liz Loh-Taylor

The Horn of Africa

When it comes to the deadly impact of the climate crisis, the Horn of Africa is now in unprecedented territory. It has endured five consecutive failed rains, and a sixth is now predicted in March.

Continued drought will bring prolonged catastrophe to people in Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia, with at least 36.4 million people needing emergency assistance to survive, up to 26 million of them acutely food insecure. Famine risk will remain for people in two districts of Somalia. More than 9.5 million livestock have already died, and more deaths are anticipated, destroying herders’ and farmers’ livelihoods.

Đọc tiếp 11 crises to watch in 2023

CFR – Daily news brief Jan. 13, 2023

Editor’s note: There will be no Daily Brief on Monday, January 16, for Martin Luther King Jr. Day.
Top of the Agenda

Japan’s Kishida Visits White House Amid Historic Military Buildup at Home

Japanese Prime Minister Kishida Fumio and U.S. President Joe Biden will meet today (WaPo) in Washington, with Biden expected to praise Japan’s plans to dramatically boost its defense spending. Their meeting is expected to focus on the war in Ukraine, Chinese military aggression, the North Korean nuclear threat, and boosting security cooperation. Ahead of the visit, U.S. National Security Council spokesperson John Kirby told Nikkei that Washington is willing to help Tokyo gain the ability to launch missile attacks on enemy territory.
The two leaders are also expected to discuss U.S. export controls (Reuters) targeting China’s semiconductor sector. Tokyo supports the controls but has not matched them. Kishida’s visit caps off a weeklong tour of Western partner countries ahead of the Group of Seven (G7) summit that Japan will host in May.
Đọc tiếp CFR – Daily news brief Jan. 13, 2023

Japan Bets Big on Bringing Semiconductor Manufacturing Home

An ambitious state-backed industrial plan targets both growth and China.

By William Sposato, a Tokyo-based journalist.

A semiconductor manufacturing plant is seen in Japan.
A semiconductor manufacturing plant is seen in Japan.

foreignpolicy.com

JANUARY 9, 2023, 12:28 PM

TOKYO—To get back some of the high-tech mojo that made it an economic powerhouse, Japan is launching an ambitious program to bring back cutting-edge semiconductor manufacturing, a field it ceded to Taiwan, South Korea, and China nearly 20 years ago. But will this new campaign at state-backed industrial policy succeed, and more importantly, is it even the right goal?

Đọc tiếp Japan Bets Big on Bringing Semiconductor Manufacturing Home

Council on Foreign Relations – Daily news brief Jan. 10, 2023

Top of the Agenda

Leaders of U.S., Canada, Mexico Meet 

U.S. President Joe Biden, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador are meeting in Mexico City (AP) for the North American Leaders’ Summit. Their discussions are expected to produce agreements (Reuters) on migration, semiconductors, climate change, and antidrug cooperation.
In a meeting between López Obrador and Biden yesterday, the two presidents pledged to step up cooperation (Reuters) on curbing fentanyl trafficking to the United States. Meanwhile, U.S. business leaders have voiced concern over López Obrador’s policies favoring state control in the economy. U.S.-Mexico trade increased by 19 percent (WaPo) in the first eleven months of 2022 as U.S. companies moved business away from China.
Đọc tiếp Council on Foreign Relations – Daily news brief Jan. 10, 2023

Counci on Foreign Relations – Daily news brief Jan. 9, 2023

Daily News BriefJanuary 9, 2023
Top of the Agenda

Bolsonaro Supporters Attack Government Buildings in Brazil

Brazilian police arrested at least three hundred people after thousands of supporters of former President Jair Bolsonaro stormed and vandalized (AP) Brazil’s Congress, Supreme Court, and presidential palace yesterday in scenes reminiscent of the January 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol. The rioters protested the results of last year’s presidential election, which Bolsonaro lost to left-wing former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. Bolsonaro has for years pushed false claims about the credibility of Brazil’s election system, and many of his supporters say the 2022 election was stolen from him.
Multiple world leaders condemned the events (NYT) and voiced support for Lula, who said there was “incompetence or bad faith” on behalf of police who allowed the events to unfold. Bolsonaro, believed to be in Florida, tweeted a condemnation (NYT) of the attack several hours after it began.
Đọc tiếp Counci on Foreign Relations – Daily news brief Jan. 9, 2023

Taking the US-India relationship to the next level

By David Santoro and Akhil Ramesh

David Santoro (david@pacforum.org) is President and CEO of the Pacific Forum. Follow him on Twitter @DavidSantoro1
Akhil Ramesh (akhil@pacforum.org) is Senior Resident Fellow at Pacific Forum.

The relationship with India is “the most important for the United States in the 21st century,” said Kurt Campbell, the Biden administration’s National Security Council Coordinator for the Indo-Pacific, last month. President Biden made similar comments earlier in 2022, and the recently published US strategic reviews also talk about the importance of India. The US National Security Strategy, for instance, states that, “As India is the world’s largest democracy and a Major Defense Partner, the United States and India will work together, bilaterally and multilaterally, to support our shared vision for a free and open Indo-Pacific.”
 
Numerous reasons explain this enthusiasm for US-India rapprochement. Even though differences between the two countries are many (notably development level), similarities also abound. Both are big countries with a large and diverse population, both are democracies and both have vibrant civil societies and incredibly innovative communities, especially in technology.
  Đọc tiếp Taking the US-India relationship to the next level

The Consequences of Divided Government for U.S. Foreign Policy

The Water’s Edge January 4, 2023, Council on Foreign Relations

by James M. Lindsay


President Joe Biden delivers his first State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress in March 2022.
Chip Somodevilla/REUTERS


Council on Foreign Relations
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Divided government is back! After two years of Democratic control of the presidency and both houses of Congress—just barely in the case of the Senate—the 118th Congress that opened yesterday puts Republicans in charge of the U.S. House of Representatives. A single party has controlled the White House and Congress only three times in the last three decades.

So what will divided government mean for U.S. foreign policy? Here are three things to watch. Đọc tiếp The Consequences of Divided Government for U.S. Foreign Policy

10 Conflicts to Watch in 2023

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is still reverberating around the world—and setting the stage for more large-scale violence to come.

JANUARY 1, 2023, 7:00 AM Foreign Policy

Ukrainian soldiers fire toward Russian positions in the Donbas region of eastern Ukraine.
Ukrainian soldiers fire toward Russian positions in the Donbas region of eastern Ukraine.

By Comfort Ero, the president and CEO of the International Crisis Group, and Richard Atwood, executive vice president of the International Crisis Group.

Will he, or won’t he? This time last year, that was the question. Russian President Vladimir Putin had massed almost two hundred thousand troops on Ukraine’s borders. U.S. intelligence warned that Russia was preparing for all-out war. All the signs pointed to an assault, bar one: It seemed unthinkable.

True, Russia had attacked Ukraine in 2014, and in the spring of 2021 had staged a dress rehearsal for an invasion, building up forces on the frontier before sending them home. Putin seemed ever angrier at Kyiv’s refusal to bow to his will. He openly derided Ukrainian national identity and sovereignty. Still, it was shocking, when Russian forces did roll in, that a nuclear-armed power in 2022 would seek to conquer a neighbor in an act of unprovoked aggression.

Đọc tiếp 10 Conflicts to Watch in 2023

Council on Foreign Relations – Daily News Brief Jan. 3, 2023

Top of the Agenda

IMF Director Warns One-Third of World Could Face Recession This Year

For most of the global economy, 2023 will be “tougher than the year we leave behind,” International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva said in a CBS interview. She said the economies of the United States, China, and the European Union (EU) are all slowing down. While Georgieva said the United States “may avoid a recession,” the Wall Street Journal found that more than two-thirds of economists at twenty-three large financial institutions are projecting a U.S. recession this year. Georgieva also said that the war in Ukraine and COVID-19 will continue to strain the economies of the EU and China, respectively. She added that countries should work to secure their supply chains but warned that dividing the global economy into U.S. and Chinese blocs could “chop $1.5 trillion” from global gross domestic product (GDP) each year. 
Đọc tiếp Council on Foreign Relations – Daily News Brief Jan. 3, 2023

Council on Foreign Relations – Daily news brief Dec. 29, 2022

Editor’s note: There will be no Daily Brief until Tuesday, January 3, in observance of New Year’s Day.
Top of the Agenda

Russia Rejects Ukraine’s Peace Conditions, Bombards Its Power Grid

Russia fired nearly seventy missiles (WaPo) at Kyiv and other Ukrainian cities today in what appeared to be one of its biggest strikes on Ukraine’s energy grid. Ukraine’s military said it shot down fifty-four of the missiles. The attack came hours after Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov reiterated Moscow’s rejection (Al Jazeera) of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s conditions for peace. 
In recent weeks, Zelenskyy has promoted a peace plan in which Russia would face a war crimes tribunal and give up occupied territories in eastern Ukraine. A Kremlin spokesperson yesterday rejected the possibility (NYT) of ceding the territories, while Lavrov said today that Kyiv’s plans to drive Russia out of eastern Ukraine were an “illusion.” 
Đọc tiếp Council on Foreign Relations – Daily news brief Dec. 29, 2022

Council on Foreign relations – Daily News Brief Dec. 21 2022

Top of the Agenda

Zelenskyy Visits Washington in First Foreign Trip Since Russia’s Invasion

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy is scheduled to meet with U.S. President Joe Biden (WaPo) and address Congress today in his first trip outside of Ukraine since Russia invaded in February. During the meeting, Biden is expected to announce a $2 billion military aid package for Ukraine that will reportedly include the Patriot missile system, the most advanced air defense system in the U.S. arsenal.
Zelenskyy’s visit comes as U.S. lawmakers consider a spending package (NYT) that includes $45 billion in emergency and economic aid to Ukraine. If approved, it would bring the total U.S. aid to Ukraine to more than $100 billion. Some lawmakers from the Republican Party, which will soon take control of the House of Representatives, have objected to the new funding. 

5 takeaways from Volodymyr Zelensky’s historic visit to Washington

Kevin Liptak

By Kevin Liptak, CNN

Updated 9:01 PM

volodymyr zelensky

Watch Zelensky unveil flag during historic speech to Congress

CNN —  Three-hundred days after his country was invaded by Russia, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky jetted to Washington, DC, for talks on what the next 300 days might bring.

Shrouded in secrecy until the last minute, the historic visit was heavy with symbolism, from Zelensky’s drab green sweatshirt to President Joe Biden’s blue-and-yellow striped tie to the Ukrainian battle flag unfurled on the House floor.

But the trip was about far more than symbols. Biden wouldn’t invite Zelensky to Washington – and endure a risky trip outside Ukraine for the first time since the war began – if he did not believe something real could be accomplished meeting face-to-face instead of over the phone.

Emerging from their talks, both men made clear they see the war entering a new phase. As Russia sends more troops to the frontlines and wages a brutal air campaign against civilian targets, fears of a stalemate are growing.

Yet as Zelensky departed Washington for a lengthy and similarly risky return trip to Ukraine, it wasn’t clear that a pathway to ending the conflict was any clearer.

Biden shakes hands with Zelensky as he arrives at the White House.
Zelensky, left, is greeted by Rufus Gifford, chief of protocol for the state department, after landing in the United States on Wednesday.
President Volodymyr Zelensky addresses Congress as Rep. Nancy Pelosi and Vice President Kamala Harris hold up a Ukrainian national flag signed by Ukrainian soldiers at the Capitol in Washington on Wednesday, December 21.

President Volodymyr Zelensky addresses Congress as Rep. Nancy Pelosi and Vice President Kamala Harris hold up a Ukrainian national flag signed by Ukrainian soldiers at the Capitol in Washington on Wednesday, December 21.Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Zelensky addresses the joint meeting of Congress.
Zelensky holds an American flag that was gifted to him by Pelosi. The flag was flown over the Capitol earlier in the day.
Zelensky addresses Congress.
Zelensky addresses the joint meeting.
Guests of the the Ukrainian delegation wave as Zelensky acknowledges them during his address.
Zelensky is greeted as he arrives to address Congress.
Zelensky speaks during a news conference with Biden in the East Room of the White House.
Biden speaks during the news conference.
Members of the media listen during the news conference in the East Room of the White House.
Biden speaks during the news conference.
Zelensky meets with Biden in the Oval Office of the White House.
<img src="https://media.cnn.com/api/v1/images/stellar/prod/221221145629-09-zelensky-us-visit-1221.jpg?c=original&q=w_1280,c_fill&quot; alt="Zelensky speaks after giving Biden a gift. He <a href="https://www.cnn.com/europe/live-news/russia-ukraine-war-news-12-21-22/h_5daaaace8ac5173e9d501b3b86978113&quot; target="_blank">presented Biden

Biden holds the Cross of Combat Merit. "He's very brave," Zelensky said of the soldier. "And he said give it to very brave President, and I want to give you, that is a cross for military merit."
Zelensky sits with Biden and first lady Jill Biden inside the White House.
Biden and Zelensky walk down the Colonnade of the White House as they make their way to the Oval Office.
Biden and Zelensky walk into the White House after Zelensky's arrival.
Biden and first lady Jill Biden welcome Zelensky at the White House on Wednesday.
Biden shakes hands with Zelensky as he arrives at the White House.
Zelensky, left, is greeted by Rufus Gifford, chief of protocol for the state department, after landing in the United States on Wednesday.
President Volodymyr Zelensky addresses Congress as Rep. Nancy Pelosi and Vice President Kamala Harris hold up a Ukrainian national flag signed by Ukrainian soldiers at the Capitol in Washington on Wednesday, December 21.
Zelensky addresses the joint meeting of Congress.
In pictures: Zelensky’s wartime visit to US
Đọc tiếp 5 takeaways from Volodymyr Zelensky’s historic visit to Washington